My Time Sports Science

MyTime Sports is partnered with Flightscope™, a 3D tracking technology that provides the most detailed data analysis available. Flightscope™ radar will be used at every MyTime event to capture the following metrics.

Here are the pitching measurements we can receive while using Flightscope™:

Pitching

Pitch Velocity

Velocity, one of the most frequently used tools for evaluating pitchers, represents the maximum speed of a given pitch at any point from its release to the time it crosses home plate. The extent of velocity’s importance has long been debated, but this much isn’t: generally speaking, the faster a pitch is thrown, the harder it is to hit. Obviously, velocity is not a one-stop shop for evaluating pitchers. There are pitchers who throw the ball hard who aren’t successful while the reverse holds true for lower velocity arms by mastering techniques like deception, movement, precision and repertoire.

Spin Rate

The reason why we care about spin in the first place is because it helps to define how a pitch can move. For example, high spin on a fastball helps the ball defy gravity for slightly longer than a pitch with average spin, and this is often referred to as a “rising fastball.” That’s a somewhat misleading name, because the ball doesn’t really rise, it just falls more slowly than a hitter expects. On fastballs, we learned that high spin tends to lead to swinging strikes and fly balls, while low spin gets grounders.

Spin Axis

Pitchers rarely (if ever) throw over the top with true backspin. The majority of pitches are thrown at an angle closer to 30-45 degrees which may result in natural cut or run.

Spin Tilt

Measures the spin direction of a pitch. Fastballs and change-ups have backspin. Whereas breaking balls have top spin.

V-Break

Distance between where the pitch actually crosses the front of home plate vertically and where it would have crossed home plate vertically if had it traveled in a perfectly straight line from release, completely unaffected by gravity.

H-Break

Distance between where the pitch actually crosses the front of home plate horizontally, and where it would have crossed home plate horizontally if had it traveled in a perfectly straight line from release. A positive number means the break was to the right from the pitcher’s perspective, while a negative number means the break was to the left from the pitcher’s perspective

V-Movement

Vertical movement from the ball’s origin in the pitcher’s glove until it’s caught by the catcher.

H-Movement

Horizontal movement from the ball’s origin in the pitcher’s glove until it’s caught by the catcher.

Zone Command

Shows the ability to throw the ball to a particular location.

Release Extension

The point at which a pitcher releases the ball is actually a few feet closer to home plate than the pitching rubber itself. Extension quantifies exactly how much closer a pitcher’s release point is to home plate. Taller pitchers with long wingspans tend to have the longest extensions, because their frames allow them to hold on to the ball for a greater distance before releasing it. Not surprisingly, a longer extension can be a major advantage to pitchers, because they are essentially shortening the distance between themselves and opposing batters. A pitcher with a longer extension can make a 93-mph fastball look like a 96-mph fastball.

Pitch Trajectory

The path that a ball takes from the pitcher’s hand at release point to the catcher’s mitt.

Here are the hitting measurements we can receive while using Flightscope™:

Exit Velo

Attaining a high exit velocity is one of a hitter’s primary goals. A hard-hit ball won’t always have a positive result, but the defense has less time to react, so the batter’s chances of reaching base are higher.

Launch Angle

Launch Angle represents the vertical angle at which the ball leaves a player’s bat after being struck. Average Launch Angle (aLA) is calculated by dividing the sum of all launch angles by all batted ball events.

As a guideline, here are the Launch Angles for different types of contact:

Ground ball: Less than 10 degrees

Line drive: 10-25 degrees

Fly ball: 25-50 degrees

Pop up: Greater than 50 degrees

Carry Distance

Shows how far the ball carried while in the air.

Batted Ball Direction

Represents the horizontal direction at which the ball leaves a player’s bat after being struck.

Zone Performance

Is how a hitter hits in certain areas of the strike zone.

Location Trends

Shows where a pitcher tends to throw to that particular hitter.

Spray Chart

Shows where hitters have hit the ball for every at bat and what pitch he hit.

Flight Trajectory

Shows the path of the ball from the catcher to second base.

Here are the catching measurements we can receive while using Flightscope™:

Popup Time

Represents the time elapsed from the moment the pitch hits the catcher’s mitt to the moment the intended fielder is projected to receive his throw at the center of the base.

Handover Time

Is the time from when the catcher catches the ball to when he releases it to second.

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